FILM REVIEW | LUCA

Luca, Pixar's newest animated addition, has made its way to Disney+ at no extra charge. Set in a picturesque Italian town, it tells the story of two young boys who enter a triathlon whilst enjoying a summer of fun. However, the two boys are harbouring a secret – they are sea monsters – and if the town residents found out, the boys would be in incredible danger. Luca is an absolute blast from start to finish, telling inspiring stories of friendship and being different.





Written by Becca Johnson

One thing that Disney Pixar productions never get wrong is the gorgeous animation. The movie was vibrant, colourful and extremely inviting from the get-go. Everything from the shimmering water to the bright buildings in the town of Portorosso were intricately designed and made for an immersive watch.


The 'fish out of water' trope may be overdone by now, yet Pixar have managed to put a fun spin on it. It may have been simplistic in its approach, yet its messages are put across perfectly and the small-scale feel only gives it more heart. The humour is there, and audience members will enjoy watching Luca learn to walk, visit a civilised town for the first time and learn to eat pasta with a fork. It also has its emotional moments, as we see our lead learn the importance of friendship, family and even education. His desire to learn about the world around him is inspiring for any member of the audience, and the lessons he learns about being there for a friend should be reminded to all.

Whether the plot was meaning to inspire or just entertain, it was always impressive. Luca is much loved by his underwater parents, yet their fear of the unknown past the shore makes him feel trapped and even more curious. When he meets fellow sea monster Alberto who enjoys a seemingly exciting life out of the water, Luca finds his courage to explore and most importantly, discovers true friendship. The movie gives us a cycling race, fishing trips, gelato and even an angry cat. It is charming and light-hearted, yet has so much to say. The voice acting was great and really helped bring these realistic characters to life; Jack Dylan Grazer and Jacob Tremblay were exceptional.


Luca may not be Pixar's new masterpiece and the plot beats may be overdone and fairly generic, yet it has so much heart and feels incredibly human. The animation is some of the best Pixar have given us, the characters were unique yet relatable, the voice acting was stand-out and the Italian-themed musical score tied everything together perfectly. It was a small, sweet and enjoyable effort from Pixar, which has not only taught us that it's okay to be different from the rest but the importance of it.